• FAQ's About Project 2020


    Question: 
    Why is it called project 2020?

    Answer: 
    If approved, construction is slated to begin in the summer of 2020.


    Question: 
    Why is this project needed?

    Answer:
    Just like your home, our school facilities require attention and maintenance to keep them operating and efficient, while protecting our investment. As you already know, planned maintenance is less costly and disruptive than having to make emergency repairs. Under the capital project, the district is eligible to receive up to 79.5% reimbursement via state building aid, thus greatly reducing the balance to be covered via the tax levy.


    Question:
    What is the project timetable?

    Answer:
    The vote will be held on March 27, 2018, and should it pass the project will be presented to the State Education Department (SED) approximately November 2018. The approval process can take one year. (SED has changed the procedure since our last project). Once approved by SED, construction would begin in the summer of 2020.


     

    Question:

    Why not just repair the existing roof?       roof leaks diagram

    Answer:
    The roof has numerous leaks and 90% of the roof is no longer under warranty. Over the past three years the District has spent approximately $35,000 on repairs. Additionally, we need to protect our investment as water damage impacts expensive infrastructure such as equipment and flooring, and can also pose dangers.

    The numerous leaks are NOT from the solar panels. The solar panels rest on a protective membrane and does not require the need for nails or other installation alterations. The work for time spent removing and returning the solar panels during the proposed project will be done at no cost per the contract agreement with Monolith Solar Associates.


    Question:
    Why wouldn’t the district be reimbursed for items such as boilers, pumps, and other equipment if we just wait for them to fail?

    Answer:
    Items such as these have a predetermined useful expected life, therefore do not qualify for state aid. The district is beginning to incur expenses associated with equipment approaching the end of their useful life. In 2018, approximately $6,000 has already been spent to rebuild two pumps. There is an energy expense associated with equipment no longer functioning efficiently. Emergency maintenance can also be disruptive to learning, depending upon when and where the emergency maintenance is required. 


    Question:
    What is the projected tax levy increase for the 2018-2019 budget?

    Answer:
    The projection is a 0.97% percent increase. This is less than a 1% increase.


    Question: 
    I want to learn more about the proposed observation pier and walkway. What additional information can you provide?

    Answer: 
    The walkway and observation pier is part of the CCS Biopreserve initiative that we are in the process of establishing on property owned by the school.  The goal of the CCS Biopreserve project is to create a learning preserve to support outdoor experiential education for students K-12, and to also showcase the growth of a renewable energy crop for use by the school. The purpose of the biopreserve project is to restore the natural areas of land behind the Dollar General to be used for the enrichment, education, and recreation for both students and the community. This student driven project will eventually include the establishment of a biomass energy plantation, arboretum, wetland boardwalk, interpretive walking trails, and improved wildlife habitat.  The bioenergy portion of the project involves the growth of shrub willow, which will be sustainably harvested in the form of wood chips to supply a 6 Kilowatt biomass gasification system that will produce heat and power for the school.  Initial site surveying of the land was performed by high school science students.  This was followed by students cleaning up of the forest, laying out of the walking trail, along with the planting of the first 225 shrub willow trees which will be used as a bioenergy crop.  Last year students planted 760 shrub willow trees on a one tenth acre test plot in the preserve as part of their research into renewable biomass energy. The project is being supported by an environmental education grant that the school received from Senators Betty Little and Kathy Marchione in 2016.  The walking trail currently is 0.4 miles in length and winds through the preserve. It is currently open to the public and is also used by students K-12. We are hoping to expand the trail system to include a raised boardwalk that will go through the wetland portion of the land.  We are also planning to construct an observation pier on the pond that is also part of the preserve. This will give students the opportunity to perform water quality assessment and other aquatic studies utilizing the pond.  It will also provide the community access to these natural areas. Because all aspects of this project need to be ADA compliant, the cost of adding the boardwalk and observation pier are high, therefore, we are hoping to utilize the building aid from the capital project to offset the cost.  The local share of the boardwalk and observation pier will be paid for by the grant. The remanding 79.5% of the cost of construction will be covered by state aid.